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Claire Trevor Biography, Age, Height, Death, Career, Net Worth And Family

Claire Trevor Biography

Claire Trevor was an American on-screen character. She showed up in more than 60 films, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting

Actress for her job in Key Largo (1948), and got designations for her jobs in The High and the Mighty (1954) and Dead End (1937). She was charged first for Stagecoach (1939); her profile was higher than John Wayne at the time.

Claire Trevor Age

Claire Trevor (born Claire Wemlinger; March 8, 1910 – April 8, 2000) was an American actress. She appeared in over 60 films, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Key Largo (1948), and received nominations for her roles in The High and the Mighty (1954) and Dead End (1937). She was billed first for Stagecoach (1939); her profile was higher than John Wayne at the time.

Claire Trevor Height

Claire an American actress. She appeared in over 60 films, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in Key Largo (1948), and received nominations for her roles in The High and the Mighty (1954) and Dead End (1937) had a standing height of 5 feet 3 inches.

Claire Trevor Family

She was born in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, the only child of Noel Wemlinger, a Fifth Avenue merchant tailor (of French birth but German ancestry), and his wife, Benjamina (“Betty”), who was of Irish birth. She was raised in New York City and, from 1923, in Larchmont, New York. For many years, her year of birth was misreported as 1909, a rare instance of an actress actually being younger than her given age, which is why her age at death was initially given as 91 and not 90.

Claire Trevor Education

Following studies in New York City at Columbia University and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Trevor began performing in repertory theatre and short films. In 1932 she made her Broadway debut in Whistling in the Dark, and the following year she appeared in The Party’s Over. Later in 1933, she made her feature film debut in Life in the Raw.

Claire Trevor Photo

Claire Trevor Career

As per her account on the site of Claire Trevor School of the Arts, “Trevor’s acting vocation traversed over seven decades and included achievements in stage, radio, TV and film…[She] frequently played the hard-bubbled blonde and each possible sort of ‘miscreant’ job.”

In the wake of finishing secondary school, Trevor started her profession with a half year of workmanship classes at Columbia University and a half year at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. She made her stage debut in the late spring of 1929 with a repertory organization in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She in this way came back to New York where she showed up in various Brooklyn-shot Vitaphone short movies and performed in summer stock theater. In 1932, she featured on Broadway as the female lead in Whistling in the Dark. She featured in her film debut, Life in the Raw.

From 1933 to 1938, Trevor starred in 29 films, often having either the lead role or the role of heroine. In 1937, she was the second lead actress (after top-billed Sylvia Sidney) in Dead End, with Humphrey Bogart, which led to her nomination for Best Supporting Actress. From 1937 to 1940, she appeared with Edward G. Robinson in the popular radio series Big Town while continuing to make movies.

In the early 1940s, she also was a regular on The Old Gold Don Ameche Show on the NBC Red Radio Network, starring with Amech in presentations of plays by Mark Hellinger. In 1939, she was well established as a solid leading lady. Some of her more memorable performances during this period include the western Stagecoach (1939). Over a decade later, she gained her third and final Oscar nomination for her performance in The High and the Mighty (1954).

Two of Trevor’s most significant jobs were inverse Dick Powell in Murder, My Sweet (1944) and with Lawrence Tierney in Born to Kill (1947). In Key Largo (1948), Trevor played Gaye Dawn, the cleaned-up dance club artist, and criminal’s moll. For that job, she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. In 1957, she won an Emmy for her job in the Producers’ Showcase scene entitled Dodsworth. Trevor moved into supporting jobs during the 1950s, with her appearances winding up uncommon after the mid-1960s. She played Charlotte, the mother of Kay (Sally Field) in Kiss Me Goodbye (1982). Her last TV job was for the 1987 TV film, Norman Rockwell’s Breaking Home Ties. Trevor showed up at the 70th Academy Awards in 1998.

Claire Trevor Net Worth

Have you been wondering how rich was the American on-screen character who was showing up in more than 60 films, winning the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her job in Key Largo (1948), and got designations for her jobs in The High and the Mighty (1954) and Dead End (1937). According to her biography on the website of Claire Trevor School of the Arts, “Trevor’s acting career spanned more than seven decades and included successes in stage, radio, television, and film…[She] often played the hard-boiled blonde and every conceivable type of ‘bad girl’ role.”

Claire Trevor Death

Trevor died of respiratory failure in Newport Beach, California, on April 8, 2000, at the age of 90. She was survived by her two stepsons and extended family. For her contribution to the motion picture industry, she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6933 Hollywood Boulevard.

Claire Trevor Legacy

The Claire Trevor School of the Arts at the University of California, Irvine, was named in Trevor’s honor. Her Oscar and Emmy statuettes are on display in the Arts Plaza, next to the Claire Trevor Theatre.

Claire Trevor Summery

Claire Trevor, (Claire Wemlinger), American actress (born March 8, 1909?, Bensonhurst, Long Island, N.Y.—died April 8, 2000, Newport Beach, Calif.), appeared in dozens of motion pictures during her half-century-long career, often as a tough-talking though vulnerable and kindhearted floozy. Films of the 1930s and ’40s provided many of her most notable roles, among them a prostitute in Stagecoach (1939); a duplicitous gold digger in Murder, My Sweet (1944); and sadistic gangster Edward G. Robinson’s mistress, a pathetic liquor-craving nightclub singer, in Key Largo (1948), for which she was awarded a best-supporting actress Academy Award.

Following studies in New York City at Columbia University and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Trevor began performing in repertory theatre and short films. In 1932 she made her Broadway debut in Whistling in the Dark, and the following year she appeared in The Party’s Over. Later in 1933, she made her feature film debut in Life in the Raw. Notable among the many other films she made in the mid-1930s were Dante’s Inferno (1935); Dead End (1937), which gained her first Oscar nomination; and The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse (1938), and from 1937 to 1940 she also performed on the radio drama Big Town.

Among Trevor’s later films were Johnny Angel (1945); The High and the Mighty (1954), for which she received her third Oscar nomination; Marjorie Morningstar (1958); How to Murder Your Wife (1965); and Kiss Me Goodbye (1982), her final film. Trevor occasionally returned to the stage, and she also made a number of television appearances. For one of her TV performances, in a revival of Dodsworth (1956), she was honored with an Emmy Award.