Project Topics

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A DYNAMIC TEACHER-STUDENT INTERACTION SYSTEM (CASE STUDY OF THE FEDERAL POLYTECHNIC, ADO-EKITI)

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A DYNAMIC TEACHER-STUDENT INTERACTION SYSTEM (CASE STUDY OF THE FEDERAL POLYTECHNIC, ADO-EKITI)

ABSTRACT

This research explores the design and implementation of a web-based system for dynamic teacher-student interaction in a classroom setting. Since time is an inelastic asset and therefore very valuable in a classroom setting, the emphasis is on being able to easily and dynamically interact, document the interaction for future supervision, and improve the learning experience of students across the Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti. The particular scenario depicted in this research is that of dynamically creating, documenting, publishing, and getting feedback from student through using multiple media interaction channels. This will improve the academic performances of students and help improve the teacher-student relationship.

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1     BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

Great relationships between teachers and students are important for student inspiration and motivation, their academic accomplishment (Brekelmans, 1989; Cornelius-White, 2007; Den Brok, 2001; Goh, 1994; Hamre & Pianta, 2001; Henderson,1995; Henderson & Fisher, 2008; Roorda, Koomen, Spilt, & Oort, 2011; Thijs & Koomen, 2008), and for teachers’ well-being (Evertson & Weinstein, 2006; Spilt, Koomen, & Thijs, 2011; Wubbels, Brekelmans, Den Brok, & Van Tartwijk, 2006). Lack of teacher student relationships are most times related to classroom management issues and is considered a major reason students’ achieve less academically with zero motivation (Brekelmans, 1989; Cornelius-White, 2007; Den Brok, 2001; Goh, 1994; Hamre & Pianta, 2001; Henderson,1995; Henderson & Fisher, 2008; Roorda, Koomen, Spilt, & Oort, 2011; Thijs & Koomen, 2008), and for teachers’ well-being (Evertson & Weinstein, 2006; Spilt, Koomen, & Thijs, 2011; Wubbels, Brekelmans, Den Brok, & Van Tartwijk, 2006). Poor teacher student relationships are related to classroom management issues and are an important reason for leaving the profession (De Jong, Van Tartwijk, Verloop, Veldman, & Wubbels, 2012; Walker, 2009).

Many other studies have been carried out all over the world to study teacher e-student relationships in various countries (e.g., The Netherlands, the United States, Canada, Australia, China, and Indonesia) and multiple educational contexts (e.g., mostly among secondary, vocational, and university education). All of these studies reported the significant and crucial role of the dynamic teacher e-student relationships in education (e.g., Fisher & Rickards, 1998; Fricke, Van Ackeren, Kauertz, & Fisher, 2012; Georgiou & Kyriakides, 2012; Henderson & Fisher, 2008; Klem & Connell, 2004; Lepointe, Legault, & Batiste, 2005; Levpuscek, Zupancic, & Socan, 2012; Maulana, Opdenakker, Den Brok, & Bosker, 2011; Mireles-Rios & Romo, 2010; Pianta, Mashburn, Downer, Hamre, & Justice, 2008; Wei, Den Brok, & Zhou, 2009; Wentzel, 1998, 2012). Teacher e-student relationships develop from daily classroom interactions between teacher and students. This research, we define interactions as real-time behavioral exchanges of two or more participants (e.g., teacher e-student or student e-student) (Markey, Lowmaster, & Eichler, 2010), and relationships as relatively stable patterns in these behavioral exchanges (Mainhard et al., 2012). When studying how daily classroom interactions and teacherestudent relationships influence each other, it is fruitful to use an approach based on Dynamic Systems (DS) theory (Granic & Hollenstein, 2003; Hollenstein, 2007, 2013). According to this law, any development of a system (e.g., a person, a dyad or a group) is hierarchically nested in time.

1.2     STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

Good relationships between teachers and students are important for student motivation and academic achievement, Poor teacher–student relationships are related to classroom management issues, Many students are faced with lot of peer pressure and other related issues when academic work is required lending to drop in academic performance. Teachers fail to understand the need to interact more with students and find their challenges, that’s why there’s a need for a dynamic teacher-student interaction system to enable teachers monitor and interact with students seamlessly.

1.3     AIMS AND OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

The main objective of the study is to Design and Implement a Dynamic Teacher-Student Interaction system for Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti. With the following objectives:

  1. Teacher–student relationships development from daily classroom interactions between teacher and students.
  2. Improve the study of how daily classroom interactions and teacher–student relationships influence each other.
  3. Experience the processes of a developmental time level denoted by the relatively stable state of certain human characteristics.

SCREEN SHOTS OF THE APPLICATION

1.4     SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY

The dynamic teacher-student interaction system will provide convenience to teachers through the easier and faster way of recording information of students. Population of students is ever increasing in all educational institution so great demand in teaching force to deploy innovative ways is also becoming higher. The dynamic teacher-student interaction system is very essential and important for school’s operations and goals. This will significantly improve students’ academic grades over time and decrease depression caused by academic failures.

1.5     SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The scope of this research is focused on a dynamic teacher-student interaction system for Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti.

1.6     DEFINITION OF TERMS.

–     Dynamic – (of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress.

–     Students– a person who is studying at a university or other place of higher education.

–     Teacher– a person who teaches, especially in a school or other place of higher education.

–     System – a set of things working together as parts of a mechanism or an interconnecting network; a complex whole.

–     Academic– (of an institution or a course of study) placing a greater emphasis on reading and study than on technical or practical work.

–     Institution – an organization founded for a religious, educational, professional, or social purpose.

–     Classroom- a room in which a class of pupils or students is taught.